Who leaves, who returns, who stays, and the SIGN network in Germany
Nov. 29, 2023
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©https://www1.wdr.de/radio/cosmo/
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Leaving Italy to work, of course, but also to have a family, in short, to fulfill themselves on a personal level as well: this is one of the main motivations of those who emigrate. But there are also grandparents and expat retirees. Delfina Licata tells us about them. With Professor Gianaurelio Cuniberti we talk about the world of Italian research in Germany and the SIGN network. Meanwhile, the Italian Parliament discusses how to reduce tax breaks for those returning to Italy. Details from Enzo Savignano.

The network of Italian scientists in Germany

Among those leaving Italy are also many graduates, researchers who often find better working and remunerative conditions beyond Italy's borders. At the Italian Embassy in Berlin, the first meeting of SIGN, an acronym for Network of Italian Scientists in Germany, was held on October 12, 2022, a Network created to connect all Italian scientists who have worked or are working in Germany or even foreigners who have studied or worked in Italy and now work in Germany.

Gianaurelio Cuniberti, professor of Materials Science and Nonotechnology at the University of Dresden, is executive director of SIGN, of which he was one of the founders. "In Germany currently there is a size of an average university made up of Italians," Cuniberti explains, "what I notice is that you don't come with a purely academic hunger. You can see that Germany has a great capacity to absorb at the industrial level. I'm talking about Dresden, which is the place I know best and is the center of microelectronics production in Europe, so they see a lot of Italians coming with the idea then to go and work in the microelectronics sector here in Saxony."

MP3

apple podcast

Who leaves, who returns, who stays, and the SIGN network in Germany
Nov. 29, 2023
Cover
©https://www1.wdr.de/radio/cosmo/
None

Leaving Italy to work, of course, but also to have a family, in short, to fulfill themselves on a personal level as well: this is one of the main motivations of those who emigrate. But there are also grandparents and expat retirees. Delfina Licata tells us about them. With Professor Gianaurelio Cuniberti we talk about the world of Italian research in Germany and the SIGN network. Meanwhile, the Italian Parliament discusses how to reduce tax breaks for those returning to Italy. Details from Enzo Savignano.

The network of Italian scientists in Germany

Among those leaving Italy are also many graduates, researchers who often find better working and remunerative conditions beyond Italy's borders. At the Italian Embassy in Berlin, the first meeting of SIGN, an acronym for Network of Italian Scientists in Germany, was held on October 12, 2022, a Network created to connect all Italian scientists who have worked or are working in Germany or even foreigners who have studied or worked in Italy and now work in Germany.

Gianaurelio Cuniberti, professor of Materials Science and Nonotechnology at the University of Dresden, is executive director of SIGN, of which he was one of the founders. "In Germany currently there is a size of an average university made up of Italians," Cuniberti explains, "what I notice is that you don't come with a purely academic hunger. You can see that Germany has a great capacity to absorb at the industrial level. I'm talking about Dresden, which is the place I know best and is the center of microelectronics production in Europe, so they see a lot of Italians coming with the idea then to go and work in the microelectronics sector here in Saxony."

MP3

apple podcast